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Kimberly Tenner
December 10, 2016

Beast Sports Nutrition Lean Up Review

Beast Sports Nutrition Lean Up

Whether you want to burn fat to lose weight or to improve your body composition, Beast Sports say they’ve got you covered with Lean Up. Lean Up, a thermogenic fat burner, is advertised to do everything from boosting metabolism to supporting mental focus and clarity.

Beast Nutrition Lean Up contains some B vitamins and herbal extracts to turn your body into a lean, focused, well-running instrument.

I was curious if Lean Up was effective and, if so, who would benefit most by using it. To find out, I decided to do more than just scratch the surface of Beast Nutrition’s advertising claims. I did real research.

Who Is Beast Sports?

The first thing to determine is who the manufacturer is and whether or not it is reliable. Oftentimes, this gives you a pretty good idea of the quality of its product.

Beast Sports, the company that manufactures and sells Lean Up, was founded in 1995 and is based in Boca Raton, Florida. I like companies that have been around for a while because it shows a solid foothold in an industry where most players go under within the first year or two.

Beast Sports is also active in social networking platforms like Facebook and Twitter, which makes the company easily accessible to customers.

However, all is not rosy in the Beast Sports garden. The company president, Anthony Altieri, also runs companies like Pharmapro and USA Nutraceuticals, neither of which have a good track record in the industry.

USA Nutraceuticals, for example, is currently involved in a lawsuit with the company MusclePharm. Meanwhile, Pharmapro was rebuked by the National Advertising Division for describing one of its products as a “legal alternative to steroids.”

Of course, just because Beast Sports is related to these 2 companies isn’t a reason to dismiss it. The power behind the throne remains the same, however, which is slight cause for concern.

I’ll keep a relatively open mind about Beast Sports, but take any praise for the company with a grain of salt.

What Ingredients Are in Beast Sports Nutrition Lean Up?

Beast Nutrition includes some B vitamins in the Lean Up formula to supply energy, but the real weight loss power comes from the 522 mg proprietary blend. Called the Lean Up Thermogenic Matrix, this blend boosts 9 ingredients and is responsible for stimulating the central nervous system to burn fat.

This seems like a lot of ingredients for such a small blend. It makes me worried that not every ingredient is included in its recommended and proven amount. For now, however, I’ll focus on analyzing the ingredients in the Lean Up Thermogenic Matrix.

Beta-Phenylethylamine HCI (PEA)

You probably don’t know it, but you’ve experienced the benefits of this ingredient several times. PEA is the organic compound in chocolate that improves mood and decreases stress. Because stress often leads to overeating and weight gain, PEA moderates your appetite and prevents you from gaining further weight.

Caffeine Anhydrous

As a relatively inexpensive and reliable stimulant, caffeine is a popular weight loss ingredient. It stimulates the central nervous system to increase metabolism, release energy, and burn fat. In one study, overweight and obese women taking caffeine saw their BMIs decrease significantly and their metabolic rate improve [1].

Raspberry Ketone

You may remember this ingredient from a 2012 episode of the “Dr. Oz Show.” Described as a “miracle” for weight loss, raspberry ketone is a chemical from red raspberries believed to boost metabolism and burn fat. In a 2004 study, overweight mice fed raspberry ketone lost significantly more fat mass than did mice in a control group [2]. However, these benefits have not yet been tested in humans.

DMAE

Better known as deanol, DMAE is a chemical in the brain that boosts focus and concentration. Although DMAE doesn’t directly contribute to weight loss, it does improve your workout. Because deanol is used to build the chemical choline, which is involved in the brain and central nervous system, it may have some effect on metabolism.

Ginkgo Biloba

This herbal extract increases blood flow to the brain, boosts oxygen levels throughout the body, and improves metabolism. This increases your daily caloric expenditure and makes it easier for you to lose weight. However, if taken too often, ginkgo can cause stomach upset and dizziness.

Evodia

Evodia is an Asian fruit commonly used to treat diarrhea and nausea. However, it also plays an important role in weight loss. According to a 2001 study involving mice, evodia reduces subcutaneous fat levels, increases energy, and boosts metabolism [3]. These effects have not yet been demonstrated in humans, however.

Hordenine

An alkaloid related to PEA, hordenine is said by some to trigger greater action in the central nervous system. However, there are virtually no scientific reports of hordenine’s effects on humans. While hordenine was shown to increase blood pressure in test animals, this didn’t lead to weight loss. Instead, it created a variety of disturbances in the cardiovascular, respiratory, and nervous systems. I’m not sure why hordenine is in Lean Up.

Rauvolfia Cansecens

Rauvolfia is an evergreen tree that contains alkaloids said to suppress appetite. When you eat less, it’s easier to attain the caloric deficit you need to lose weight. However, some anecdotal evidence suggests rauvolfia actually increases appetite and slows the metabolism, causing weight gain. Because there are no human trials on this extract, it’s difficult to judge the truth of these claims.

cAMP

cAMP is a so-called “second messenger,” which means it carries signals throughout the body. Supporters say cAMP kicks metabolism into gear and allows you to use fat as energy. However, cAMP mainly flushes out water weight and can often leave users dehydrated.

Beast Sports has included a lot of interesting ingredients in Lean Up, but I’m a little concerned that so many have not yet been tested in humans. Mice studies are exciting, but they don’t automatically mean the effects will translate to humans.

I’m also concerned about the addition of hordenine. Not only is hordenine unproven, it’s virtually untested. Its potential effects make me nervous.

Furthermore, I don’t think there’s enough room in this blend to include each ingredient in its proper amount. This may mean the effectiveness of Lean Up is compromised.

What’s the Best Way to Use Lean Up?

Beast Sports wants you to take a cautious approach to using Lean Up. They recommend taking 1 capsule twice daily for the first 3 days. If you react well, you can upgrade to 2 capsules twice daily. Never take more than 4 capsules a day.

Also avoid taking Lean Up within a few hours of bedtime, as this product contains stimulants that can keep you awake.

For the best results, eat a low-calorie diet and exercise regularly.

What’s the Best Deal on Lean Up?

One good thing about Lean Up is that availability is good. Although it doesn’t retail on BeastSports.com, you can find it in a variety of other places, including:

VitaminHerbStore.com
Price: $29.99

A1Supplements.com
Price: $30.95

SupplementWarehouse.com
Price: $33.50

Assuming Lean Up is effective, this is a pretty good deal on a diet pill of this kind.

Is This Product Worth a Shot?

Beast Sports Lean Up seems promising, but without more information on ingredient quantity, I can’t recommend it. If you can find a good deal on Lean Up, it might be worth a try. However, there are better products available that use many of the same ingredients you find here.

References

[1] Costill, D.L., G.P. Dalsky, and W.J. Fink. 1978. Effects of caffeine ingestion on metabolism and exercise performance. Medicine and Science in Sports: Vol. 10, Issue 3.

[2] Morimoto, C., Y. Satoh, M. Hara, S. Inoue, and T. Tsujita. 2005. Anti-obese action of raspberry ketone. Life Sciences: Vol. 77, Issue 2.

[3] Kobayashi, Y., Y. Nakano, M. Kizaki, K. Hoshikuma, Y. Yokoo, and T. Kamiya. 2001. Capsaicin-like anti-obese activities of evodiamine from fruits of Evodia rutaecarpa, a vanilloid receptor agonist. Planta Medica: Vol. 67, Issue 7.


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