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Kimberly Tenner
December 10, 2016

BeautyCleanse Review

BeautyCleanse

BeautyCleanse Herbal Detox is a non-laxative all-natural supplement designed to eliminate environmental toxins while supporting a healthy digestive system.

Advertisements would have you believe that its ingredients “work to stimulate liver cleansing, increased blood flow to the kidneys, and elimination through the intestinal tract.”

While BeautyCleanse looks like an easy way to slim down and shed harmful waste, I can’t help but wonder if it is as effective as advertisements claims.

To find out the truth about BeautyCleanse, I investigated the ingredients and analyzed them for safety and effectiveness.

What’s Inside the Bottle?

BeautyCleanse’s 839 mg fomula consists of 3 proprietary blends featuring 32 different herbs and botanicals. While the sheer number of ingredients is impressive, I’m naturally skeptical of proprietary blends.

Without knowing ingredient concentrations, it’s impossible to tell if the ingredients are used correctly. Too much of an ingredient may cause negative side effects while too little will fail to produce results at all.

Furthermore, not all of the ingredients are backed with clinical research.

Proprietary Herbal Detox Blend

Spirulina. A blue-green algae, this ingredient is currently being researched for its potential effect on the immune system, swelling, and viral infection.

It is often recommended as a source for vitamin B and iron, and many herbalists suggest spirulina for weight loss, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and diabetes.

However, MedlinePlus experts state, “there isn’t enough scientific evidence to determine whether or not they are effective for any of [these uses].” [1]

Parsley. Parsley is commonly used as a breath freshener, though it also exhibits diuretic properties. Herbalists recommend parsley for treating urinary tract infections, kidney stones, and gastrointestinal disorders.

It contains the chemical quercetin, which is an effective antioxidant that may lower cholesterol levels and reduce inflammation. [2]

Oat Straw. Oat straw is commonly used as a stimulant and tonic. It is said to improve blood circulation problems, reduce inflammation, and even lower blood pressure.

Anecdotal evidence suggests oat straw is an effective aphrodisiac; however, further research is needed to determine its full effects on weight loss.

Artichoke. This plant contains chemicals which reduce nausea and vomiting, spasms, and intestinal gas. It stimulates bile flow from the liver and is commonly used to treat high cholesterol and IBS.
According to research, artichoke may promote weight loss by suppressing appetite. [3]

Fenugreek. Fenugreek seeds contain phytochemicals which mimic hormones and may increase libido. It is said to improve digestive and maintain a healthy metabolism as well.

Studies show fenugreek suppresses aromatase activity, resulting in increased testosterone levels. Researchers found fenugreek significantly “affected percent body fat, total testosterone, and bioavailable testosterone.” [4]

Dandelion. Dandelion root is a natural diuretic and laxative. According to University of Maryland Medical Center experts, dandelion has antioxidant properties and may improve the immune system. [5]

Turmeric. This popular spice has long been used as a natural treatment for heartburn, stomach pain, diarrhea, and intestinal gas. It contains chemicals which reduce inflammation and fight bacteria.

Experts often recommend at least 500 mg turmeric taken 4 times daily to treat upset stomach. [6]However, BeautyCleanse only contains 839 mg in its entire formula. I doubt there is enough turmeric to provide adequate results.

Milk Thistle. Milk thistle exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects. It is commonly used to treat liver problems such as cirrhosis, jaundice, and hepatitis.

Unfortunately, milk thistle studies often come with mixed results, and there are no studies linking milk thistle with weight loss.

Marshmallow. Marshmallow root forms a protective layer on the digestive tract lining. It contains chemicals which reduce swelling and inflammation while promoting healing. Additionally, it may exhibit mild diuretic effects, alleviating excess water retention.

But like many other ingredients in BeautyCleanse, there is not enough evidence validating marshmallow root for these uses. [7]

Garlic. Garlic contains the chemical allicin which boosts immunity by eliminating toxins and improving circulation.

Animal studies suggest garlic extract improves blood pressure and sugar metabolism in as little as 2 weeks, though further human research is needed. [8]

Green Tea Extract. Green tea contains natural antioxidants that eliminate harmful toxins while improving metabolism. Researchers are particularly interested in green tea’s EGCG content, as it may optimize metabolic and cardiovascular health. [9]

Proprietary Nutraceutical Blend

L-Glutamine. Glutamine is an amino acid used to create protein. It is the most abundant free amino acid in the muscles. Glutamine aids in muscle recovery and may counter the side effects of certain medical treatments.

According to researchers, glutamine promotes glycogen storage in the muscles, giving you the energy you need for an effective workout. [10]

L-Glutathione. This naturally produced substance is involved in tissue repair and muscle building. It is essential for maintaining a healthy immune system while fighting harmful environmental toxins.

Some experts believe glutathione may prevent signs of aging by recycling vitamins C and E. However, further research is needed to verify this effect.

Lycopene. An antioxidant, lycopene protects against damage on a cellular level. It reduces free radical damage and may protect against certain types of cancer. [11]

Quercetin. Quercetin is a flavonoid commonly found in fruits and vegetables. It exhibits antioxidant effects, reducing free radical damage and inflammation. Preliminary research suggest quercetin targets adipocyte cells and induces apoptosis (cell death) to prevent obesity, but further research is needed to verify this effect. [12]

Gamma Oryzanol. This compound is commonly used to increase testosterone levels and lower cholesterol. However, there is not enough clinical research validating this use in human subjects.

Calcium D-Glucarate. A naturally occurring chemical, calcium d-glucarate is believed to treat hormone-dependent cancers such as breast, prostate, and colon cancer. Once again, there is not enough information to know if this ingredient is safe or effective. [13]

Resveratrol. Resveratrol is a powerful antioxidant commonly found in grapes. It reduces free radical damage and cardiovascular disease risk.

Recent studies suggest resveratrol mimics the metabolic effects of dieting and exercising by lowering blood glucose levels and liver fat in obese men in just 30 days. [14]

Methyl Sulfonyl Methane. More commonly abbreviated to MSM, this bioavailable sulfur promotes healing and tissue repair while boosting immunity. It is often used as a treatment for arthritis and joint pain.

But, there are no studies linking MSM to weight loss.

N-Acetyl-L-Cystein. This amino acid is often used to treat acetaminophen poisoning. Experts recommend n-acetyl-l-cysteine as a natural treatment for chest pain and preventing chronic bronchitis. [15]

While useful for eliminating toxins and other harmful chemicals, n-acetyl-l-cystein does not have a direct impact on weight loss.

Zeaxanthin. Also known as lutein or bladderwrack, this seaweed contains varying amounts of iodine which may improve thyroid function. So far, there isn’t enough scientific evidence to determine if bladderwrack is an effective thyroid treatment. [16]

Proprietary BloatEase Blend

Ginger. Ginger is a popular digestive aid due to its ability to reduce nausea and inflammation.

Ginger has no effect on glucose, insulin, lipids, or inflammatory markers. However, researchers found ginger enhances thermogenesis and reduces hunger, making it a potential obesity treatment. [17]

Cayenne. Cayenne contains the chemical capsaicin, which exhibits thermogenic effects. It increases the body’s core temperature to promote caloric expenditure and fat burning. This effect may be reduced if dieters consume cayenne regularly. [18]

Peppermint. Peppermint has a calming and numbing effect on the digestive tract, reducing spasms and treating diarrhea and gas. It improves bile flow for proper fat digestion and may even treat irritable bowel syndrome. [19]

Spearmint. Spearmint acts similarly to peppermint in that it has a calming effect on the stomach. It alleviates gas, indigestion, nausea, diarrhea, and even IBS.

Interestingly enough, spearmint herbal teas may exhibit an anti-androgen effect, resulting in a decrease in testosterone and an increase in luteinizing hormone. [20]But further research is needed to confirm these effects.

Gentian. This herb contains bitter constituents that stimulate saliva secretion and gastric juice production. It improves digestion, alleviates flatulence, and normalizes gall bladder and liver function. [21]

Coriander. Coriander is a popular digestive aid commonly used to treat upset stomach and nausea. It is purported to lower blood sugar levels and kill some parasites.

Animal studies suggest improves and/or mimics insulin action and secretion, but further human research is needed to determine its full effects on glucose. [22]

Fennel. Dried fennel seeds are often used in cooking and are said to treat various digestive problems. Studies show fennel contains high antioxidant concentrations which protect against stress and eliminate harmful toxins. [23]

Papaya. Papaya contains the digestive enzyme papain. It aids in digestion, prevents and treats gastrointestinal tract disorders, and may act as a mild diuretic.

Unfortunately, clinical research on papaya’s weight loss properties is limited.

Cumin. Cumin is used for digestive disorders. It stimulates the secretion of digestive enzymes in the stomach, resulting in improved digestion and decreased flatulence. [24]

Black Pepper. Black pepper contains the alkaloid piperine which increases absorption of other nutrients. Although it doesn’t have a direct impact on weight loss or detoxifying, it could enhance your overall results by working synergistically with the other ingredients.

Are There Side Effects to Worry About?

Don’t let the “all-natural” concept foo you into thinking a supplement is completely safe and side-effect free. Many of the herbs in BeautyCleanse are associated with negative side effects if used inappropriately.

Since ingredient concentrations are not disclosed, it’s impossible to anticipate the full range of negative side effects.

However, the following side effects are associated with many of the ingredients inside BeautyCleanse, so it’s best to exercise caution.

• Stomach pain and cramping
• Diarrhea
• Constipation
• Nausea and vomiting
• Mood swings and irritability

How to Use BeautyCleanse

Manufacturers recommend taking 2 capsules per day with an 8 oz. glass of water, preferably with a meal. It is unknown if there is an ideal time to take BeautyCleanse or if the dosage is flexible.

Interestingly enough, BeautyCleanse is designed for 30-day use, which is much longer than many of these ingredients should be used. Experts often recommend that some of the ingredients only be taken for a few days at a time because of their side effect risk.

However, 839 mg divided among so many ingredients means that the ingredients are in relatively small concentrations, so it’s possible BeautyCleanse is safe to use for this long.

Additionally, manufacturers state that it is imperative for dieters to be committed to following a healthy diet and weight loss program.
To get the best results:

“Be sure you’re following a diet that contains lean sources of protein such as poultry and fish, avoiding fatty choices such as red meat. Load up on fresh fruits, vegetables, and fiber, and kick the processed food to the curb. Don’t forget to drink plenty of water. This allows the kidneys, gastrointestinal system, and liver a chance to flush out any toxins you have accumulated in your system.”

Product Pricing and Guarantee

BeautyCleanse is available from multiple online distributors for an affordable price:

• BeautyFit.com: $26.99
• BodyBuilding.com: $31.65
• VitaCost.com: $33.29

Should You Try BeautyCleanse?

BeautyCleanse seems like a natural way to detoxify the body. The ingredients are commonly found in other digestive aids and when used appropriately, should keep side effects minimal.

However, I’m not convinced BeautyCleanse is the best way to lose weight. The ingredients are designed to promote regularity and eliminate toxins, not burn fat and suppress appetite.

Furthermore, the 32 ingredients are a lot to cram into a single formula. Many of the ingredients may be in concentrations too small to be effective.

There are better supplements available for burning fat and losing weight, so be sure to shop around before settling with BeautyCleanse.

References

[1] “Blue-Green Algae.” MedlinePlus. Available from: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/923.html

[2] “Quercetin.” University of Maryland Medical Center. Available from: http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/quercetin-000322.htm

[3] Daniells, Stephen. “Kidney bean and artichoke extracts show satiety potential.” Nutra Ingredients USA. Nov. 2011. Available from: http://www.nutraingredients-usa.com/Research/Kidney-bean-and-artichoke-extracts-show-satiety-potential

[4] Wilborn C, Taylor L, Poole C, Foster C, Willoughby D, Kreider R. “Effects of a purported aromatase and 5α-reductase inhibitor on hormone profiles in college-age men.” Int J Sport Nutr Exerc Metab. 2010 Dec;20(6):457-65. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21116018

[5] “Dandelion.” University of Maryland Medical Center. Available from: http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/dandelion-000236.htm

[6] “Turmeric.” WebMD. Available from: http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-662-TURMERIC.aspx?activeIngredientId=662&activeIngredientName=TURMERIC

[7] “Marshmallow.” WebMD. Available from: http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-774-MARSHMALLOW.aspx?activeIngredientId=774&activeIngredientName=MARSHMALLOW

[8] Chapman, James. “Why garlic can help you lose weight.” Mail Online Health. Available form: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/article-87815/Why-garlic-help-lose-weight.html

[9] Swen Wolfram, PhD. “Effects of Green Tea and EGCG on Cardiovascular and Metabolic Health.” J Am Coll Nutr August 2007 vol. 26 no. 4 373S-388S. Available from: http://www.jacn.org/content/26/4/373S.long

[10] Bowtell JL, Gelly K, Jackman ML, Patel A, Simeoni M, Rennie MJ. “Effect of oral glutamine on whole body carbohydrate storage during recovery from exhaustive exercise.” J Appl Physiol. 1999 Jun;86(6):1770-7. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10368336

[11] “Lycopene.” MedlinePlus. Available from: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/druginfo/natural/554.html

[12] Goepp, Julius. “Quercetin.” Life Extension Magazine. April 2009. Available from: http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2009/apr2009_Quercetin_01.htm

[13] “Calcium D-Glucarate.” WebMD. Available from: http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-136-CALCIUM%20D-GLUCARATE.aspx?activeIngredientId=136&activeIngredientName=CALCIUM%20D-GLUCARATE

[14] Moisse, Katie. “Red Wine Ingredient Resveratrol Mimics Diet, Exercise in Obese Men.” ABC News. Nov. 1, 2011. Available from: http://abcnews.go.com/Health/w_DietAndFitnessNews/red-wine-ingredient-resveratrol-mimics-calorie-restriction-obese/story?id=14852698

[15]”N-Acetyl Cysteine.” WebMD. Available from: http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-1018-N-ACETYL%20CYSTEINE.aspx?activeIngredientId=1018&activeIngredientName=N-ACETYL%20CYSTEINE

[16]”Bladderwrack.” WebMD. Available from: http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-726-LUTEIN%20(Zeaxanthin).aspx?activeIngredientId=726&activeIngredientName=LUTEIN%20(Zeaxanthin)

[17] Mansour MS, Ni YM, Roberts AL, Kelleman M, Roychoudhury A, St-Onge MP. “Ginger consumption enhances the thermic effect of food and promotes feelings of satiety without affecting metabolic and hormonal parameters in overweight men: a pilot study.” Metabolism. 2012 Oct;61(10):1347-52. doi: 10.1016/j.metabol.2012.03.016. Epub 2012 Apr 24. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22538118

[18] Goodnman, Brenda. “Cayenne pepper may burn calories, curb appetite.” WebMD Health News. April 27, 2010. Available from: http://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20110427/cayenne-pepper-may-burn-calories-curb-appetite

[19] “Peppermint.” University of Maryland Medical Center. Available from: http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/peppermint-000269.htm

[20] “Akdoğan M, Tamer MN, Cüre E, Cüre MC, Köroğlu BK, Delibaş N. “Effect of spearmint (Mentha spicata Labiatae) teas on androgen levels in women with hirsutism.” Phytother Res. 2007 May;21(5):444-7. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17310494

[21] “Gentian.” WebMD. Available from: http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-716-GENTIAN.aspx?activeIngredientId=716&activeIngredientName=GENTIAN

[22] Alison M. Gray and Peter R. Flatt. “Insulin-releasing and insulin-like activity of the traditional anti-diabetic plant Coriandrum sativum (coriander).” British Journal of Nutrition (1999), 81, 203–209. Available from: http://journals.cambridge.org/download.php?file=%2FBJN%2FBJN81_03%2FS0007114599000392a.pdf&code=50d02137e267b772d563057d88374391

[23] Münir Oktay, İlhami Gülçin, Ö.İrfan Küfrevioğlu. “Determination of in vitro antioxidant activity of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare) seed extracts. LWT – Food Science and Technology, Volume 36, Issue 2, March 2003, Pages 263–271. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/S0023-6438(02)00226-8. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0023643802002268

[24] Platel K, Srinivasan K. “Digestive stimulant action of spices: a myth or reality?” Indian J Med Res. 2004 May;119(5):167-79. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15218978


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