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Kimberly Tenner
December 5, 2016

Kardio Fire Review

Kardio Fire

Kardio Fire users are almost guaranteed to experience a tingling sensation because every serving holds 4 g Carnosyn beta alanine.

And, a Kardio Fire reviewer on BodyBuilding.com noticed a “slight burning sensation” that coincides with the product’s fiery name.

Feeling a supplement’s effects is one reliable indicator of potency and efficacy. Still, let’s look at the complete Kardio Fire picture to compare this pre-workout supplement with similar products.

Examining the Ingredients

Kardio Fire contains several common pre-workout and diet pill ingredients. Research indicates some Kardio Fire ingredients are more proven than others to enhance exercise performance or promote fat burning.

Carnosyn Beta Alanine. Beta alanine boosts muscles’ carnosine concentrations. Carnosine regulates muscle pH and minimizes fatigue. Numerous studies on this patented ingredient show it enhances athletic ability during quick, intense exercise or strength training. [1]

In one study, college athletes using 4 g beta alanine per day gained significant lean muscle mass. [2] Kardio Fire contains 4 g Carnosyn in every serving to match this clinically tested dose.

BCAAs. Leucine, isoleucine, and valine are amino acids collectively known as BCAAs. BCAAs are perfect amino acids for building muscle fiber because the liver usually doesn’t break them down as it does other amino acids. Taking BCAAs before a workout prevents muscle fatigue and promotes faster muscle recovery. [3]

Experts recommend taking 5 g BCAAs per dose in a specific ratio: equal amounts isoleucine and valine to twice as much leucine. [3] Kardio Fire uses the correct ratio but has only 3 g BCAAs per serving.

Glutamine. Glutamine is a common amino acid which the body typically makes on its own. High stress such as heavy exercise reduces glutamine levels. [4] But, using glutamine before weightlifting doesn’t improve strength or reduce fatigue. [5]

Raspberry Ketone. Raspberry ketone has become a hugely popular weight loss supplement ingredient. This rise in popularity is based largely on in vitro and animal research showing raspberry ketone breaks down fat cells and discourages weight gain. [6] [7] But, despite its popularity, there are no published human trials of raspberry ketone or known effective doses.

Caffeine Anhydrous. In doses as low as 100 mg, caffeine boosts energy, enhances mental focus, and increases calorie burning. [8] No wonder this stimulant is found in numerous supplements and diet pills. My only complaint about Kardio Fire’s caffeine content is the unclear dosage. Because it’s part of a proprietary blend, it’s impossible to know how much caffeine is in each Kardio Fire serving.

Citrus Aurantium. Citrus aurantium contains a chemical called synephrine. Synephrine acts on fat cells’ B3 receptors to encourage fat cell breakdown. [9] Research indicates citrus aurantium moderately enhances weight loss in doses between 50 and 60 mg, especially when combined with caffeine. [10]

Do These Ingredients Cause Side Effects?

Although Kardio Fire uses clinically tested ingredients, some are known to cause side effects.

For example, beta alanine taken in doses higher than 1.6 g per serving causes a tingling sensation called paraesthesia. Paraesthesia is harmless, and some people even like feeling this effect. [11] One Kardio Fire reviewer appreciated that “the tingly sensation from the beta alanine last[s] all workout instead of only the first few minutes.” Still, be aware Kardio Fire’s beta alanine dose is almost certain to cause this side effect.

People who are sensitive to caffeine may experience jitters, stomach issues, or headache from taking Kardio Fire. [12] Similarly, combining caffeine with citrus aurantium’s synephrine may increase risk of elevated blood pressure or faster heart rate. [13] However, research on citrus aurantium indicates it generally causes no adverse side effects. [10]

Getting Results with Kardio Fire

The directions for Kardio Fire say to take 1 scoop 30 minutes before your workout. As long as you take Kardio Fire no more than an hour before your workout, I’m sure you’ll experience the benefits of beta alanine and the other ingredients.

You can also use Kardio Fire in the middle of your workout to provide a second jolt of energy. This is a great way to use Kardio Fire if you intend to perform multiple types of exercise, such as weight training followed by a cardio workout.

If you’re trying to build muscle, I recommend stacking Kardio Fire with a BCAA protein shake. Kardio Fire’s BCAA content isn’t big enough to promote large muscle gains.

Is Kardio Fire Expensive?

I’ve seen Kardio Fire selling for about $35 on several popular supplement websites. That places Kardio Fire on the less expensive end of the pre-workout supplement price spectrum.

The main advantage Kardio Fire has over comparably priced pre-workout supplements is its huge beta alanine dose. Most pre-workout supplements in that price range have no more than 2 g beta alanine.

How Does Kardio Fire Compare to Other Pre-Workout Supplements?

Kardio Fire is a great pre-workout for people who love the effects of beta alanine, including the tingling sensation. While Kardio Fire’s additional ingredients also have benefits, the amount of Carnosyn in Kardio Fire is what sets this product apart from other pre-workout supplements.

If you’re a beta alanine fan, I recommend giving Kardio Fire a try. But, if you’d rather avoid the beta alanine tingles, shop around for a pre-workout supplement with a lower dose of that ingredient.

References

[1] WebMD. “Beta-Alanine.” Available from: http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-1222-BETA-ALANINE.aspx?activeIngredientId=1222&activeIngredientName=BETA-ALANINE.

[2] Kern, Benjamin, and Tracey Robinson. “Effects of beta-alanine supplementation on performance and body composition in collegiate wrestlers and football players.” Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition. 6 (Suppl 1) (2009): P2. Available from: http://www.jissn.com/content/6/S1/P2.

[3] “10 Rules of BCAAS.” GNC Livewell. 2011. Available from: http://www.gnclivewell.com.au/health-knowledge-details.asp?id=122&cid=7.

[4] “Glutamine.” University of Maryland Medical Center, 2011. Available from: http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/supplement/glutamine.

[5] Antonio, J, MS Sanders, D Kalman, D Woodgate, and C Street. “The effects of high-dose glutamine ingestion on weightlifting performance.” Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 16.1 (2002): 157-60. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11834123.

[6] Park, Kyoung Sik. “Raspberry ketone increases both lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.” Planta Medica. 76.15 (2010): 1654-8. Available from: http://www.radiantnutra.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Raspberry-ketone-increases-both-lipolysis-and-fatty-acid-oxidation-in-3T3-L1-adipocytes.pdf.

[7] Morimoto, C, Y Satoh, et al. “Anti-obese action of raspberry ketone.” Life Science. 77.2 (2005): 194-204. Available from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0024320505001281.

[8] Astrup, A, S toubro, et al. “Caffeine: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of its thermogenic, metabolic, and cardiovascular effects in healthy volunteers.” The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 51.5 (1990): 759-767. Available from: http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/51/5/759.short.

[9] Stohs, Sidney J., Harry G. Preuss, and Mohd Shara. “A Review of the Receptor-Binding Properties of p-Synephrine as Related to Its Pharmacological Effects.” Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity. 2011. Available from: http://www.nutratechinc.com/advz/Studies2011/Mech%20of%20Action/M1%20Stohs%200611.pdf.

[10] Stohs, SJ, HG Preuss, and M Shara. “A review of the human clinical studies involving Citrus aurantium (bitter orange) extract and its primary protoalkaloid p-synephrine.” International Journal of Medical Science. 9.7 (2012): 527-38. Available from: http://www.medsci.org/v09p0527.htm.

[11] “Applications.” CarnoSyn.com. 2013. Available from: http://www.carnosyn.com/applications.

[12] WebMD. “Caffeine.” Available from: http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-979-caffeine.aspx?activeIngredientId=979&activeIngredientName=caffeine&source=1.

[13] WebMD. “Bitter Orange.” Available from: http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-976-bitter+orange.aspx?activeIngredientId=976&activeIngredientName=bitter+orange&source=1.


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